Xtreme Shred Information (Prohormones)

Xtreme Shred by


Ratings
Ingredients
Manufactured by:
Anabolic Technologies

Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings Per Container: 60

Active Ingredient
5a-androstano(2,3-c)furazan-17b-tetrahydropyranol-ether - 50mg

Xtreme Slim and Shred Blend 150mg
Taraxacum Officinale, Caffeine, Green Tea Extract (60% ECGC)

More stuff
Milk Thistle - 100mg
N-acetyl-L-cysteine - 100mg
Tongkat Ali - 100mg

Inactive stuff
Gelatin, Silica, Magnesium Stearate, Stearic Acid

Orastan-A is a legal variation of Furzabol, which is very similar to the steroid Winstrol.

I can't find a recommended dosage here; none of the sites selling it list one. For the active compound, most manufacturers recommend 150mg a day, but individuals report not seeing much from this. User-recommended dosing ranges from 250-350mg daily.

This is a mild, non-methylated compound, hence cycles can be longerm ranging anywhere from 5 to 9 weeks. The higher the dosage, the shorter the duration. If you're going to run a longer cycle, it's better off to build up than run at a high dosage for the full duration.

The main issue here is cost. Current street price of Xtreme Sgred seems to be arounf $50 - $60 US (as of 23 May 12). If your dosing 5 caps a day, 1 bottle lasts 12 days. A run of 48 days (almost 7 weeks) would require 4 bottles, or over $200 in product. Pretty steep compared to other available compounds.

Still, this is an especially good product for beginners, especially if you can see see results from 150mg a day, which some users report being effective.

Necause it's not methylated, it's a very popular companion compound used in stacks with a strong methylated prohormone.

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5a-androstano[2,3-c]furazan-17b-tetrahydropyranol-ether (Orastan-A)

Orastan-A (aka Furuza-A, Furazadrol, Furaguno) is an legal variation of Furzabol, which is similar to Winstrol. There are/were many clones on teh market:

You will also see the nomenclature 5a-androstanol[2,3]furazan-17b-tetrahydropyranol or 5a-etioallocholan(2,3-)furazan-17b-tetrahydropyranol used. Both of these compounds will produce nearly identical results.

This compound is mild and good for first time users. It's also not methylated, which means no liver stress. Orastan-A is a better cutter than bulker, and is popular to stack with becuase it's no methylated and has a low incident of sides.

Orastan-A shows better benefits at much higher than recommended dosages, but be aware that higher dosages mean more risk of side effects.

Most label dosage recommends 150mg daily, but 250mg seems to be a more common dosage. Some users report great result and few sides using dosages up to 350mg daily. A good protocol woul dbe to start at 200mg and work up to 300mg. If sides remain low, bump to 350mg. Cycles can range from 5 to 9 weeks. Running a very high dosage for a extended cycle isn't recommended.

Dosages should be evenly split during the day.

Orastan-A is mild enough to allow for an over-the-counter PCT, although higher dosages and personal reaction to the compound might mean a pharmaceutical grade PCT is needed.

Caffeine

Caffeine is a bitter, white crystalline xanthine alkaloid that acts as a stimulant drug. Caffeine is found in varying quantities in the seeds, leaves, and fruit of some plants, where it acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plants.

In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Caffeine is toxic at sufficiently high doses, but ordinary consumption poses few known health risks, even when carried on for years. There may be a modest protective effect against some diseases, including certain types of cancer.

Caffeine has diuretic properties when administered to people who are not used to it, but regular users develop a tolerance to this effect, and studies have generally failed to support the common notion that ordinary consumption contributes significantly to dehydration. With heavy use, strong tolerance develops rapidly and caffeine can produce clinically significant physical and mental dependence.

Caffeine is used both recreationally and medically to reduce physical fatigue and to restore alertness when drowsiness occurs. It produces increased wakefulness, faster and clearer flow of thought, increased focus, and better general body coordination. The amount of caffeine needed to produce effects varies from person to person, depending on body size and degree of tolerance. Effects begin less than an hour after consumption, and a moderate dose usually wears off in about five hours.

Consumption of more than 250 mg per day can lead to a condition known as caffeinism, a combination of caffeine dependency with a wide range of unpleasant physical and mental conditions including nervousness, irritability, restlessness, insomnia, headaches, and heart palpitations after caffeine use.

Coffee consumption is associated with a lower overall risk of cancer. This is primarily due to a decrease in the risks of hepatocellular and endometrial cancer, but it may also have a modest effect on colorectal cancer. Heavy coffee consumption may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Caffeine has been shown to inhibit cellular DNA repair mechanisms. There is little or no evidence that caffeine consumption increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, and it may somewhat reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Drinking four or more cups of coffee per day does not affect the risk of hypertension compared to drinking little or no coffee. However those who drink 1-3 cups per day may be at a slightly increased risk. Caffeine increases intraocular pressure in those with glaucoma but does not appear to affect normal individuals. It may protect people from liver cirrhosis. Caffeine may increase the effectiveness of some medications including ones used to treat headaches.

Gelatin

Gelatin is a tasteless substance created from collagen found in animal skin and bones. It is used to thicken liquid in processed foods as well as having applications in photography, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Gelatin is found in many forms of candy, marshmallows, Jell-O, and some types of yogurt. Gelatin can be bought in many grocery stores for use in home cooking. In the vast majority of cases, gelatin is not harmful to the consumer.

Green Tea Extract

Green tea extract is a herbal derivative from green tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). Containing antioxidant ingredients ? mainly green tea catechins (GTC) ? green tea and its derivatives are sought-after amongst people who pursue health.

Green tea extracts exhibit stronger antioxidant protection for human body than vitamin C and vitamin E. Scavenging effect of lipid free-radicals (one antioxidant property) of polyphenols in green tea extracts can be clearly observed in experiments. The ability of GTP in green tea extracts to eliminate lipid-derived free radicals is noticeably stronger (almost 50 times) than that of ginkgo biloba extracts.

Further investigations indicate that the boosting level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione dismutase (GSHPx) may account for the inhibitory effect of GTC against lipid oxidation (rancidification). It should be mentioned that from the antioxidant perspective, green tea extracts are, generally speaking, more effective than black tea extracts due to the better preservation of catechins.

The anticarcinogenic property make the green tea extracts a hotspot in recent scientific researches. In many experiments, green tea extracts show inhibitory effects on cancer cells. In vitro assays, Catechin and caffeine, which are main components in green tea extracts, block the cell cycle of cancer cells (cytotoxicity) and induce programmed cell death.

Green tea extracts also contain a wide-ranged anti-inflammatory characteristics, so it may be helpful in treating chronic inflammatory states.

Long Jack (Eurycoma Longifolia, Tongkat Ali, Pasak Bumi)

Long Jack (Eurycoma longifolia - commonly called tongkat ali or pasak bumi) is a flowering plant in the family Simaroubaceae, native to Indonesia, Malaysia, and, to a lesser extent, Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos.

Even though there are other legitimate medical areas of interest in Eurycoma longifolia, most Southeast Asians consume it for the plant's impact on sexual conduct. Already in 2001, Malaysian scientific researchers opened their peer-reviewed, Medline-archived report on Eurycoma longifolia's effect on lab rats with the statement "that Eurycoma longifolia Jack commonly known as Tongkat Ali has gained notoriety as a symbol of man's ego and strength by the Malaysian men because it increases male virility and sexual prowess during sexual activities."

Some scientific studies found that it enhances sexual characteristics and performance in rodents. Other laboratory animal tests have produced positive indications, with one extract having been observed to increase sexual activity in mature rats, including arousal, sniffing, and mounting behavior. In an experiment conducted on male rats, it was found that eurycoma longifolia increases sperm count. The authors also reported that the plasma testosterone level of Eurycoma longifolia extract treated rats "was significantly increased when compared with that of the control and infertile animals."

Another group of scientists confirmed that Eurycoma longifolia has the capacity to "reverse the inhibitory effects of estrogen on testosterone production and spermatogenesis." One Medline-indexed journal article cited as result that Eurycoma longifalia had an effect similar to testosterone replacement therapy in counteracting ostereoposis.

In a placebo-controlled human study with healthy young men in a weight-training program, it was found that "the lean body mass of the treatment group showed a significant increment, from 52.26 (7.18) kg to 54.39 (7.43) kg (p = 0.012)." The results of the study were published in the peer-reviewed British Journal of Sports Medicine.

The anabolic impact of Eurycoma longifolia has been confirmed in the animal model, when the size and weight of just one muscle was measured in treated and untreated rats of equal size. "Results showed that 800 mg/kg of butanol, methanol, water and chloroform fractions of E. longifolia Jack significantly increased (p<0.05) the leavator ani muscle".

Because of Eurycoma longifolia's testosterone-enhancing capacity, it has been included in numerous supplements marketed primarily to body building men. In gym circles, Eurycoma longifolia Jack is commonly referred to as Longjack.

Magnesium Stearate

Magnesium stearate is often used as a diluent in the manufacture of medical tablets, capsules and powders. In this regard, the substance is also useful, because it has lubricating properties, preventing ingredients from sticking to manufacturing equipment during the compression of chemical powders into solid tablets.

Magnesium stearate is the most commonly used lubricant for tablets. Studies have shown that magnesium stearate may affect the release time of the active ingredients in tablets, but not that it reduces the over-all bioavailability of those ingredients.

N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)

Acetylcysteine, also known as N-acetylcysteine or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (abbreviated NAC), is a pharmaceutical drug and nutritional supplement used primarily as a mucolytic agent and in the management of paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose. Other uses include sulfate repletion in conditions, such as autism, where cysteine and related sulfur amino acids may be depleted.

Cysteine is an amino acid that can be found throughout the body. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a modified form of cysteine, has been shown to increase levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Antioxidants such as glutathione can reduce cell damage, speed recovery from injury and aid muscle growth.

NAC is a popular supplement with a wide variety of uses. Because it reduces muscle damage and strengthens the immune system, NAC is used by endurance athletes such as long-distance runners, cyclists and triathletes. Many athletes include NAC in their diet when they are in the early stages of recovering from an injury.

The anabolic effect of NAC on muscle tissue also makes it popular with athletes wanting to gain lean muscle size and strength, including body builders, rugby players, and sprinters.

Silicon Dioxide (Silica)

The chemical compound silicon dioxide, also known as silica, is an oxide of silicon. Silica is most commonly found in nature as sand or quartz.

Silica is common additive in the production of foods, where it is used primarily as a flow agent in powdered foods, or to absorb water in hygroscopic applications. It is the primary component of diatomaceous earth which has many uses ranging from filtration to insect control. It is also the primary component of rice husk ash which is used, for example, in filtration and cement manufacturing.

Stearic Acid

Stearic acid is the saturated fatty acid with an 18 carbon chain and has the IUPAC name octadecanoic acid. It is a waxy solid, and the salts and esters of stearic acid are called stearates. It occurs in many animal and vegetable fats and oils, but it is more common in animal fat. The important exceptions are cocoa butter and shea butter, whose fatty acids consist of 2845% stearic acid.

Stearic acid is used in making candles, plastics, dietary supplements, oil pastels and cosmetics, softening rubber, and hardening soaps. Stearic acid is used in aerosol shaving cream products. It is used along with simple sugar or corn syrup as a hardener in candies and to form margarines, shortenings, spreads, and as a cream base for baked products.

Even though stearic acid is a saturated fat, studies have suggested that it has little effect on blood cholesterol levels, because such a high proportion is converted to oleic acid.

Taraxacum Officinate (dandelion)

Taraxacum officinale AKA dandelion is a herbaceous perennial plant of the family Asteraceae (Compositae). It can be found growing in temperate regions of the world, in lawns, on roadsides, on disturbed banks and shores of water ways, and other areas with moist soils.

The flowers are used to make dandelion wine, the greens are used in salads, the roots have been used to make a coffee-like drink and the plant was used by Native Americans as a food and medicine.

The leaves--dandelion greens--can be eaten cooked or raw in various forms, such as in soup or salad. They are probably closest in character to mustard greens. Usually the young leaves and unopened buds are eaten raw in salads, while older leaves are cooked. Raw leaves have a slightly bitter taste. The leaves are high in vitamin A, vitamin C and iron.

In Silesia and also other parts of Poland and world, dandelion flowers are used to make a honey substitute syrup with added lemon (so-called May-honey). This "honey" is believed to have a medicinal value, in particular against liver problems.

Dandelion root is a registered drug in Canada, sold principally as a diuretic. A hepatoprotective effect of chemicals extracted from dandelion root has been reported and the plant is known for its ability to treat jaundice, cholecystitis and cirrhosis. The dandelion also affects the digestive system by acting as a mild laxative, increasing appetite, and improving digestion.