PCT Assist Information (Post Cycle Support)

PCT Assist by


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Ingredients
Manufactured by:
Competetive Edge Labs (CEL)

Serving Size: 3 capsules
Servings per Container: 60

Ingredients:
Trans Resveratrol (50%) - 600mg
Quercitin (95%) - 600mg
Indole 3 Carbinol - 175mg
Horny Goat Weed (standardized fro 60% Icariin) - 250mg
Coleus Forskohlii (10% Forskolin) - 100mg
Piperine (95%) - 20mg

Other Ingredients: Magnesium Stearate

Recommended usage
Take 3 capsules twice daily spaced out 8 to 12 hours apart, preferably with meals. Do not use for more than 6 to 8 weeks without at least a 4 week break between cycles.

PCT Assist is a collection of "natural herbals" that will supposed promote testosterone production and inhibit estrogen to help you recover hormonal balance after a prohormone or designer steroid cycle.

Thing is, as far as I can tell, no one really knows if this works.

I did the Internet thing, and some people claim it worked great (meaning that they kept their gains and had no gyno) while other's said it didn't work at all.

I couldn't find anyone who'd actually run it and done blood testing to actually see the effects it had on hormone levels.

I know a lot of you are looking for a good over-the-counter PCT regimine; this might--or might not--be an effective part of one.

If you've used this, report your experience/results/opinion below!

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Coleus Forskohlii

Plectranthus barbatus, or more commonly known as Coleus forskohlii and Indian Coleus (Kikuyu: Maigoya), is a tropical perennial plant related to the typical coleus species. It is interesting from a scientific and medicinal standpoint because it produces forskolin.

Coleus is increasingly being used to assist weight loss by breaking down adipose tissue and preventing production of fatty tissue. In addition, coleus mildly stimulates the metabolism by increasing thyroid hormones and increasing the secretion of insulin. These therapeutic indications for coleus are due to its principal active compound, a diterpenoid called forskolin. This is the only plant-derived compound known to directly stimulate the enzyme adenlylate cyclase and, in turn, stimulate cellular cyclic AMP which boosts metabolism.

Increased cellular cyclic AMP reduces histamine, making coleus beneficial in the treatment of allergies. Coleus is also a bronchodilator with an anti-histamine action, making it useful in treating asthma. Conditions such as hypothyroidism, eczema, psoriasis are also improved by using coleus, largely due to its ability to increase cyclic AMP.

Indian and Chinese studies in the last two years have isolated a number of diterpenoids in the stem and leaves of coleus forskohlii with a focus on treatment of gastric cancer and preventing metastatic (secondary) cancers. These have been carried out on animal models with success.

Epimedium (Horny Goat Weed)

Epimedium, also known as Rowdy Lamb Herb, Barrenwort, Bishop's Hat, Fairy Wings, Horny Goat Weed, or Yin Yang Huo, is a genus of about 60 or more species of herbaceous flowering plants in the family Berberidaceae.

Many species of Epimedium are alleged to have aphrodisiac qualities. It is sold as a health supplement, usually in raw herb, tablet, or capsule form and sometimes blended with other supplements. The "active ingredient" in Epimedium is icariin, which can be found in standardized extracts from 5% up to 60% potent.

Icariin is purported to work by increasing levels of nitric oxide, which relax smooth muscle. It has been demonstrated to relax rabbit penile tissue by nitric oxide and PDE-5 activity. Other research has demonstrated that injections of Epimedium extract directly into the penis of the rat results in an increase in penile blood pressure.

Like sildenafil (Viagra), icariin, the active compound in Epimedium, inhibits the activity of PDE-5. Epimedium has been shown to up-regulate genes associated with nitric oxide production and changes in adenosine/guanine monophosphate balance in ways that other PDE5 inhibitors do not.

Indole-3-carbinol

Indole-3-carbinol is produced by the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucobrassicin, which can be found at relatively high levels in cruciferous vegetables.

Indole-3-carbinol is the subject of on-going Biomedical research into its possible anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and anti-atherogenic effects. Research on indole-3-carbinol has been conducted primarily using laboratory animals and cultured cells. Limited and inconclusive human studies have been reported.

A recent review of the biomedical research literature found that "evidence of an inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and breast or prostate cancer in humans is limited and inconsistent" and "larger randomized controlled trials are needed" to determine if supplemental indole-3-carbinol has health benefits.

Indole-3-carbinol occurs naturally in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and kale. It is also widely available in supplement form.

Indole-3-carbinol blocks estrogen receptor sites on the membranes of breast and other cells, thereby reducing the risk of cervical and breast cancer. Indole-3-carbinol increases the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrone to 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and inhibits the 4-hydroxylation of estradiol. This is a favourable action of indole-3-carbinol because 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone have carcinogenic action. The estrogen metabolite 2-hydroxyestrone has protective against several types of cancer.

Magnesium Stearate

Magnesium stearate is often used as a diluent in the manufacture of medical tablets, capsules and powders. In this regard, the substance is also useful, because it has lubricating properties, preventing ingredients from sticking to manufacturing equipment during the compression of chemical powders into solid tablets.

Magnesium stearate is the most commonly used lubricant for tablets. Studies have shown that magnesium stearate may affect the release time of the active ingredients in tablets, but not that it reduces the over-all bioavailability of those ingredients.

Piperine

Piperine is the alkaloid responsible for the pungency of black pepper and long pepper, along with chavicine (an isomer of piperine). It has also been used in some forms of traditional medicine and as an insecticide.

Piperine has been found to inhibit human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein, enzymes important for the metabolism and transport of xenobiotics and metabolites. In animal studies, piperine also inhibited other enzymes important in drug metabolism. By inhibiting drug metabolism, piperine may increase the bioavailability of various compounds and alter the effectiveness of some medications.

Piperine may also have some harmful side effects. Preliminary evidence shows it may be toxic in some circumstances, and may even interfere with reproductive processes, including negative effects on sperm. Piperine at doses higher than 15 mg daily may affect the metabolism of a wide range of drugs. Even lower doses may affect the bodys metabolism of some drugs.

Piperine may also form cancer-causing substances when eaten with nitrates. Experts suggest that people who take piperine supplements should be careful when also eating food that contains nitrates as a preservative.

Not enough human studies have been done to determine the side effects of chronic supplementation with piperine. For the time being, it is a good idea to take 2 days off a week, and one full week off each month from the use of a piperine supplement. It is quite likely that the small amounts of piperine could provide health benefits while larger amounts could be toxic or damaging to the liver or other organs.

Quercetin

Quercetin (a flavonol) is a plant-derived flavonoid found in fruits, vegetables, leaves and grains. It also may be used as an ingredient in supplements, beverages or foods.

Several studies show quercetin may have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and it is being investigated for a wide range of potential health benefits. Quercetin may have inhibitory properties against cancer, prostatitis, heart disease, cataracts, allergies/inflammations, and respiratory diseases, such as bronchitis and asthma. It has also been claimed that quercetin reduces blood pressure in hypertensive subjects. An in vitro study showed that quercetin and resveratrol combined inhibited production of fat cells.

Despite preliminary indications of possible medicinal effects, quercetin has neither been confirmed as a specific therapeutic for any condition nor has it been approved by any regulatory agency. A bioavailability study done on rats showed that ingested quercetin is extensively metabolized into non-active phenolic acids, with more than 96% of the ingested amount excreted within 72 hours, indicating actual physiological roles, if they exist, involve quercetin in only minute amounts.

Trans Resveratrol

Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a stilbenoid, a type of polyphenol, and a phytoalexin produced naturally by several plants when under attack by pathogens such as bacteria or fungi.

Resveratrol is currently a topic of numerous animal and human studies into its effects. The effects of resveratrol on the lifespan of many model organisms remain controversial, with uncertain effects in fruit flies, nematode worms, and short-lived fish. In mouse and rat experiments, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, blood-sugar-lowering and other beneficial cardiovascular effects of resveratrol have been reported. Most of these results have yet to be replicated in humans.

In the only positive human trial, extremely high doses (35 g) of resveratrol in a proprietary formulation designed to enhance its bioavailability have been necessary to significantly lower blood sugar. Despite mainstream press alleging resveratrol's anti-aging effects, there is little present scientific basis for the application of these claims to mammals.

Resveratrol is found in the skin of red grapes and is a constituent of red wine. Resveratrol has also been produced by chemical synthesis or by biotechnological synthesis (metabolic engineered microorganisms) and is sold as a nutritional supplement derived primarily from Japanese knotweed.

Bioavailability
Although trans-resveratrol appears to be well-absorbed by humans when taken orally, its bioavailability is relatively low due to its rapid metabolism and elimination. Resveratrol metabolites are primarily detected upon oral exposure to trans-resveratrol. When six healthy men and women took an oral dose of 25 mg of trans-resveratrol, only traces of the unchanged resveratrol were detected in plasma. Plasma concentrations of resveratrol and metabolites peaked around 60 minutes later.

A study in 12 healthy men administered an oral dose of 25 mg of trans-resveratrol per 70 kg of body weight reported that serum concentration of resveratrol and metabolites peaked at 30 minutes after administration. Results of another study suggested that the bioavailability of resveratrol from grape juice, which contains mostly glucosides of resveratrol (piceid), may be even lower than that of trans-resveratrol.

Estrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activities
Endogenous estrogens are steroid hormones synthesized by humans and other mammals; these hormones bind to estrogen receptors within cells. The estrogen-receptor complex interacts with unique sequences in DNA (estrogen response elements; EREs) to modulate the expression of estrogen-responsive genes. A compound that binds to estrogen receptors and elicits similar responses to endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen agonist, while a compound that binds estrogen receptors but prevents or inhibits the response elicited by endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen antagonist.

The chemical structure of resveratrol is very similar to that of the synthetic estrogen agonist, diethylstilbestrol, suggesting that resveratrol might also function as an estrogen agonist. However, in cell culture experiments resveratrol acts as an estrogen agonist under some conditions and an estrogen antagonist under other conditions. In estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells, resveratrol acted as an estrogen agonist in the absence of the endogenous estrogen, 17beta-estradiol, but acted as an estrogen antagonist in the presence of 17beta-estradiol.

At present, it appears that resveratrol has the potential to act as an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on such factors as cell type, estrogen receptor isoform (ER alpha or ER beta), and the presence of endogenous estrogens.