Natural PCT Information (Post Cycle Support)

Natural PCT by


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Ingredients
Manufactured by:
Xcel Sports Nutrition

Serving Size: 2 capsules
Servings Per Container: 30

Ingredients:
EstroControl Blend 105mg
Indole-3-carbinol
Chrysin
Resveratrol

TestSupport Blend 720mg
Testofen (Fenugreek)
Cissus Quadrangularis
Tongkat Ali (Longjack)
3,4-Divanillytetrahydrofuran (Stinging Nettle)

LivSupport Blend 300mg
Milk Thistle (80% Silymarin)
N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC)

Suggested Use:
We suggest you take one capsule, two times per day. This product may be taken in a 4 week or 8 week cycle depending on desired results.

Post Cycle Therapy (PCT) works in 3 ways:
1. Stops the body from forming the aromatose enzyme which the body uses to convert androgens to estrogens.
2. Restarts the body's natural production of testosterone.
3. Contains powerful antioxidants that enhance liver health.

We have to agree with the ingredient panel, and statement that the product works in 3 different ways.

The ingredients are quality, NAC has been proven in medicine to have antioxidant, and potentially anti-cancer effects, and the ratios of ingredients are where they should be.



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Chrysin

Chrysin (5,7-Dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid extracted from the plant Passiflora coerulea, a member of the passion flower family. It is promoted in bodybuilding to be an effective aromatase inhibitor. Aromatase causes the conversion of testosterone into estradiol and androstenedione into estrone.

Chrysin is widely sold in the supplement industry despite the fact that no real-life studies have been able to substantially prove its effectiveness in humans. Studies done in-vivo show that orally administered chrysin does not have clinical aromatase inhibitor activity.

Studies observed chrysin has no effect on estrogen levels, but may have other detrimental effects to the body, particularly to thyroid function. A 30 day study administered chrysin to four groups of mice both orally and via injection to examine chrysin's effect on serum estrogen levels. The results showed chrysin had no effect on estrogen levels. Further, the mice treated with chrysin became considerably fatter, possibly due to chrysin's ability to disrupt thyroid function.

Another study on rats administered 50 mg of chrysin per kg body weight, considerably more than found in dietary supplements. Chrysin was found to have no ability to inhibit aromatase, possibly due to poor absorption or bioavailability.

Cissus Quadrangularis

Also know as: Asthisonhara, Chadhuri, Chaudhari, Cissus, Cissus Extract, Cissus Formula, Cissus Formulation, C. Quadrangularis, Cissus Quadrangularis, Cissus Quadrangularis Extract, CORE, CQ, CQE, CQR-300, Hadjod, Hadjora, Harbhanga, Harsankari, Hasjora, Kandavela, Mangaroli, Nalleru, Namunungwa, Phet Cha Sung Khaat, Phet Sang Kat, Phet Sangkhat, Pirandai, Quadrangularis, Samroi To, San Cha Khuat, Vajravalli, Vedhari, Veld Grape, Veldt-grape, Vitis Quadrangularis, Winged Treebine.

Cissus quadrangularis is a succulent vine from Africa and Asia. All parts of the plant are used for medicine. It is a rich source of carotenoids, triterpenoids and ascorbic acid. Compounds that act as receptor antagonists of glucocorticoids have reduced the healing time of broken bones 30 to 50 percent in clinical trials. It has also been used to treat obesity and associated oxidative stress. Its bactericidal effects on Helicobacter pylori hold promise as an effective treatment of gastric ulcers and preventative of stomach cancer in conjunction with NSAID therapy.

Test tube studies and research in animals show that it has antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory properties. It might have activity against the organism that causes malaria. Athletes claim ciccus provides joint protection and reduces joint pain. Often used in conjunction with 'dry' anabolic compounds.

Some specific commercial products containing Cissus quadrangularis seem to be safe when used appropriately in adults, short-term for up to 6-8 weeks. Some people who took these products experience side effects such as headache, flatulence, dry mouth, diarrhea, and insomnia, but there is not enough information to know how often these side effects might occur. Long-term safety is not known.

Do not take Cissus quadrangularis if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Fenugreek

Fenugreek is a plant in the family Fabaceae used both as an herb (the leaves) and as a spice (the seed).

Fenugreek seeds are a rich source of the polysaccharide galactomannan and saponins such as diosgenin, yamogenin, gitogenin, tigogenin, and neotigogens. Other bioactive constituents of fenugreek include mucilage, volatile oils, and alkaloids such as choline and trigonelline.

Due to its estrogen-like properties, fenugreek has been found to help increase libido and lessen the effect of hot flashes and mood fluctuations that are common symptoms of menopause and PMS. Recent studies have shown that Fenugreek helps lower blood glucose and cholestrol levels, and may be an effective treatment for both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Fenugreek is also being studied for its cardiovascular benefits.

Fenugreek seed is widely used as a milk producing agent by nursing mothers to increase breast milk supply. Studies have shown fenugreek is a potent stimulator of breastmilk production. It can be found in capsule form in many health food stores.

Several human intervention trials demonstrated that the antidiabetic effects of fenugreek seeds ameliorate most metabolic symptoms associated with type-1 and type-2 diabetes in both humans and relevant animal models by reducing serum glucose and improving glucose tolerance.
medicine.

Indole-3-carbinol

Indole-3-carbinol is produced by the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucobrassicin, which can be found at relatively high levels in cruciferous vegetables.

Indole-3-carbinol is the subject of on-going Biomedical research into its possible anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and anti-atherogenic effects. Research on indole-3-carbinol has been conducted primarily using laboratory animals and cultured cells. Limited and inconclusive human studies have been reported.

A recent review of the biomedical research literature found that "evidence of an inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and breast or prostate cancer in humans is limited and inconsistent" and "larger randomized controlled trials are needed" to determine if supplemental indole-3-carbinol has health benefits.

Indole-3-carbinol occurs naturally in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and kale. It is also widely available in supplement form.

Indole-3-carbinol blocks estrogen receptor sites on the membranes of breast and other cells, thereby reducing the risk of cervical and breast cancer. Indole-3-carbinol increases the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrone to 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and inhibits the 4-hydroxylation of estradiol. This is a favourable action of indole-3-carbinol because 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone have carcinogenic action. The estrogen metabolite 2-hydroxyestrone has protective against several types of cancer.

Long Jack (Eurycoma Longifolia, Tongkat Ali, Pasak Bumi)

Long Jack (Eurycoma longifolia - commonly called tongkat ali or pasak bumi) is a flowering plant in the family Simaroubaceae, native to Indonesia, Malaysia, and, to a lesser extent, Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos.

Even though there are other legitimate medical areas of interest in Eurycoma longifolia, most Southeast Asians consume it for the plant's impact on sexual conduct. Already in 2001, Malaysian scientific researchers opened their peer-reviewed, Medline-archived report on Eurycoma longifolia's effect on lab rats with the statement "that Eurycoma longifolia Jack commonly known as Tongkat Ali has gained notoriety as a symbol of man's ego and strength by the Malaysian men because it increases male virility and sexual prowess during sexual activities."

Some scientific studies found that it enhances sexual characteristics and performance in rodents. Other laboratory animal tests have produced positive indications, with one extract having been observed to increase sexual activity in mature rats, including arousal, sniffing, and mounting behavior. In an experiment conducted on male rats, it was found that eurycoma longifolia increases sperm count. The authors also reported that the plasma testosterone level of Eurycoma longifolia extract treated rats "was significantly increased when compared with that of the control and infertile animals."

Another group of scientists confirmed that Eurycoma longifolia has the capacity to "reverse the inhibitory effects of estrogen on testosterone production and spermatogenesis." One Medline-indexed journal article cited as result that Eurycoma longifalia had an effect similar to testosterone replacement therapy in counteracting ostereoposis.

In a placebo-controlled human study with healthy young men in a weight-training program, it was found that "the lean body mass of the treatment group showed a significant increment, from 52.26 (7.18) kg to 54.39 (7.43) kg (p = 0.012)." The results of the study were published in the peer-reviewed British Journal of Sports Medicine.

The anabolic impact of Eurycoma longifolia has been confirmed in the animal model, when the size and weight of just one muscle was measured in treated and untreated rats of equal size. "Results showed that 800 mg/kg of butanol, methanol, water and chloroform fractions of E. longifolia Jack significantly increased (p<0.05) the leavator ani muscle".

Because of Eurycoma longifolia's testosterone-enhancing capacity, it has been included in numerous supplements marketed primarily to body building men. In gym circles, Eurycoma longifolia Jack is commonly referred to as Longjack.

Milk Thistle (SILYMARIN)

The milk thistle is a thistle of the genus Silybum Adans., a flowering plant of the daisy family (Asteraceae). They are native to the Mediterranean regions of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The name "milk thistle" derives from two features of the leaves: they are mottled with splashes of white and they contain a milky sap.

The seeds of the milk thistle have been used for 2000 years to treat chronic liver disease and protect the liver against toxins. Increasing research is being undertaken on the physiological effects, therapeutic properties and possible medical uses of milk thistle.

Research into the biological activity of silymarin and its possible medical uses has been conducted in many countries since the 1970s. Milk thistle has been reported to have protective effects on the liver and to greatly improve its function. It is typically used to treat liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis (liver inflammation), toxin-induced liver damage, and gallbladder disorders.

Reviews of the literature covering clinical studies of silymarin vary. A review using only studies with both double-blind and placebo protocols concluded that milk thistle and its derivatives "does not seem to significantly influence the course of patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C liver diseases".

A different review of the literature performed for the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services found that while there is strong evidence of legitimate medical benefits, the studies done to date are of uneven design and quality that no firm conclusions about degrees of effectiveness for specific conditions or appropriate dosage can yet be made.

A review of studies of silymarin and liver disease which are available on the web shows an interesting pattern in that studies which tested low dosages of silymarin concluded that silymarin was ineffective[13], while studies which used significantly larger doses concluded that silymarin was biologically active and had therapeutic effects.

Beside benefits for liver disease, other unproven treatment claims include:

Used as a post (oral steroid) cycle therapy for body builders and/or in the hopes of reducing or eliminating liver damage

Lowering cholesterol levels

Reducing insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes who also have cirrhosis

Reducing the growth of cancer cells in breast, cervical, and prostate cancers.

Used in many products claiming to reduce the effects of a hangover

Used by individuals withdrawing from opiates, especially during the Acute Withdrawal Stage.

Reducing liver damaging effects of chemotherapeutic drugs

Clinical study has shown that liver function tests can be improved in active hepatitis patients.

N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)

Acetylcysteine, also known as N-acetylcysteine or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (abbreviated NAC), is a pharmaceutical drug and nutritional supplement used primarily as a mucolytic agent and in the management of paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose. Other uses include sulfate repletion in conditions, such as autism, where cysteine and related sulfur amino acids may be depleted.

Cysteine is an amino acid that can be found throughout the body. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a modified form of cysteine, has been shown to increase levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Antioxidants such as glutathione can reduce cell damage, speed recovery from injury and aid muscle growth.

NAC is a popular supplement with a wide variety of uses. Because it reduces muscle damage and strengthens the immune system, NAC is used by endurance athletes such as long-distance runners, cyclists and triathletes. Many athletes include NAC in their diet when they are in the early stages of recovering from an injury.

The anabolic effect of NAC on muscle tissue also makes it popular with athletes wanting to gain lean muscle size and strength, including body builders, rugby players, and sprinters.

Resveratrol

Resveratrol is a stilbenoid, a type of polyphenol, and a phytoalexin produced naturally by several plants when under attack by pathogens such as bacteria or fungi.

Resveratrol is currently a topic of numerous studies. In mouse and rat experiments, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, blood-sugar-lowering and other beneficial cardiovascular effects of resveratrol have been reported. Most of these results have yet to be replicated in humans. Despite mainstream press alleging resveratrol's anti-aging effects, there is little scientific basis for these claims.

Resveratrol is found in the skin of red grapes and is a constituent of red wine. Resveratrol has also been produced by chemical synthesis or by biotechnological synthesis (metabolic engineered microorganisms) and is sold as a nutritional supplement derived primarily from Japanese knotweed.

A compound that binds to estrogen receptors and elicits similar responses to endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen agonist, while a compound that binds estrogen receptors but prevents or inhibits the response elicited by endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen antagonist. The chemical structure of resveratrol is very similar to that of the synthetic estrogen agonist, diethylstilbestrol, suggesting that resveratrol might also function as an estrogen agonist. However, in cell culture experiments resveratrol acts as an estrogen agonist under some conditions and an estrogen antagonist under other conditions. In estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells, resveratrol acted as an estrogen agonist in the absence of the endogenous estrogen, 17beta-estradiol, but acted as an estrogen antagonist in the presence of 17beta-estradiol.

At present, it appears that resveratrol has the potential to act as an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on such factors as cell type, estrogen receptor isoform (ER alpha or ER beta), and the presence of endogenous estrogens.

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)

Stinging nettle or common nettle, Urtica dioica, is a herbaceous perennial flowering plant, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best-known member of the nettle genus Urtica. The plant has many hollow stinging hairs called trichomes on its leaves and stems, which act like hypodermic needles that inject histamine and other chemicals that produce a stinging sensation when contacted by humans and other animals. The plant has a long history of use as a medicine and as a food source. In medieval Europe, it was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain.

Stinging nettle has been used for hundreds of years to treat painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia. Today, many people use it to treat urinary problems during the early stages of benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH, for urinary tract infections, for hay fever (allergic rhinitis), or in compresses or creams for treating joint pain, sprains and strains, tendonitis, and insect bites.

Studies in people suggest that stinging nettle, in combination with other herbs (especially saw palmetto), may be effective at relieving symptoms such as reduced urinary flow, incomplete emptying of the bladder, post urination dripping, and the constant urge to urinate associated with an enlarged prostate. Laboratory studies have shown stinging nettle to be comparable to finasteride (a medication commonly prescribed for BPH) in slowing the growth of certain prostate cells. However, unlike finasteride, the herb does not decrease prostate size.

The leaves and stems of nettle have been used historically to treat arthritis and for sore muscles. Studies have been small and not conclusive, but do suggest some people find relief from joint pain by applying nettle leaf topically to the painful area.

One preliminary human study suggested that nettle capsules helped reduce sneezing and itching in people with hay fever. Researchers think that may be due to nettle's ability to reduce the amount of histamine the body produces in response to an allergen.

Some preliminary animal studies indicate that nettle may lower blood sugar and blood pressure, but there is not enough evidence to say whether this is also true in humans.