Milk Thistle Information (On Cycle Support)

Milk Thistle by


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Ingredients
Manufactured by:
Nature's Way

Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings per Container: 120

Ingredients:
Blessed Thistle (stem, leaf, flower) 180mg
Milk Thistle Dried Extract (seed) standardized to 80% silymarin 175mg

Nature's Way Milk Thistle Directions:
Take 1 capsule three times daily with food or water.

Company Copy:
Nature's Way standardized milk thistle is a scientifically and technically advanced herbal extract standardized to 80% silymarin. Nature's Way Milk Thistle extract supports normal liver function. The active bioflavonoid complex, silymarin and it's sub- component silibinin, are powerful antioxidants in the liver and exert a protective effect against substances that may be potentially harmful to the liver.

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Blessed Thistle (Cnicus benedictus)

Blessed Thistle (aka cnicus benedictus St. Benedict's thistle, holy thistle or spotted thistle) is a thistle-like plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Mediterranean region, from Portugal north to southern France and east to Iran. It is known in other parts of the world, including parts of North America, as an introduced species and often a noxious weed.

It has sometimes been used as a galactogogue to promote lactation. The crude drug contains about 0.2% cnicin. It is recommended for use by public health nurses in Ontario, Canada, as well as by the Canadian Breastfeeding Foundation along with fenugreek to increase lactation in nursing mothers.

It is a component in Bitters formulas, which are used to treat digestive issues and it may have anti-inflammatory, nootropic and anticancer effects.

Blessed thistle is used to stimulate secretion of gastric juices and saliva, to increase appetite and facilitate digestion, and to stimulate the flow of bile.

It has been used as a minor component of the alternative cancer remedy Flor-Essence and has antibacterial and antifungal activity. Other pharmacologic activities for blessed thistle include blockade of gonadotropin and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are no reported human clinical trials for any of these uses.

Milk Thistle (SILYMARIN)

The milk thistle is a thistle of the genus Silybum Adans., a flowering plant of the daisy family (Asteraceae). They are native to the Mediterranean regions of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The name "milk thistle" derives from two features of the leaves: they are mottled with splashes of white and they contain a milky sap.

The seeds of the milk thistle have been used for 2000 years to treat chronic liver disease and protect the liver against toxins. Increasing research is being undertaken on the physiological effects, therapeutic properties and possible medical uses of milk thistle.

Research into the biological activity of silymarin and its possible medical uses has been conducted in many countries since the 1970s. Milk thistle has been reported to have protective effects on the liver and to greatly improve its function. It is typically used to treat liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis (liver inflammation), toxin-induced liver damage, and gallbladder disorders.

Reviews of the literature covering clinical studies of silymarin vary. A review using only studies with both double-blind and placebo protocols concluded that milk thistle and its derivatives "does not seem to significantly influence the course of patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C liver diseases".

A different review of the literature performed for the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services found that while there is strong evidence of legitimate medical benefits, the studies done to date are of uneven design and quality that no firm conclusions about degrees of effectiveness for specific conditions or appropriate dosage can yet be made.

A review of studies of silymarin and liver disease which are available on the web shows an interesting pattern in that studies which tested low dosages of silymarin concluded that silymarin was ineffective[13], while studies which used significantly larger doses concluded that silymarin was biologically active and had therapeutic effects.

Beside benefits for liver disease, other unproven treatment claims include:

Used as a post (oral steroid) cycle therapy for body builders and/or in the hopes of reducing or eliminating liver damage

Lowering cholesterol levels

Reducing insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes who also have cirrhosis

Reducing the growth of cancer cells in breast, cervical, and prostate cancers.

Used in many products claiming to reduce the effects of a hangover

Used by individuals withdrawing from opiates, especially during the Acute Withdrawal Stage.

Reducing liver damaging effects of chemotherapeutic drugs

Clinical study has shown that liver function tests can be improved in active hepatitis patients.