Prohormone & Supplement Ingredients:

Avena Sativa (Common Oat)

The common oat (Avena sativa) is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name. While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and rolled oats, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed.

Oats are most commonly rolled or crushed into oatmeal or ground into oat flour. Oatmeal is chiefly eaten as porridge, but may also be used in a variety of baked goods, such as oatcakes, oatmeal cookies, and oat bread. Oats are also an ingredient in many cold cereals, in particular muesli and granola. Oats may also be consumed raw, and cookies with raw oats are becoming popular.

In Britain, oats used for brewing beer. Oatmeal stout is one variety brewed using a percentage of oats for the wort. A cold, sweet drink called Avena made of ground oats and milk is a popular refreshment throughout Latin America.

Oat bread was first manufactured in Britain, where the first oat bread factory was established in 1899. In Scotland, a dish called sowans was made by soaking the husks from oats for a week, so that the fine, floury part of the meal remained as sediment to be strained off, boiled and eaten. Oats are also widely used there as a thickener in soups, as barley or rice might be used in other countries.

Oat extract can also be used to soothe skin conditions. It is the principal ingredient for the Aveeno line of products.

Oat grass has been used traditionally for medicinal purposes, including to help balance the menstrual cycle, treat dysmenorrhoea, and for osteoporosis and urinary tract infections.

Oats are generally considered healthful. The discovery of the healthy cholesterol-lowering properties has led to wider appreciation of oats as human food.

Oats contain more soluble fibre than any other grain, resulting in slower digestion and an extended sensation of fullness. One type of soluble fibre, beta-glucans, has proven to help lower cholesterol.

Oats are the only cereal containing a globulin or legume-like protein, avenalin, as the major (80%) storage protein. The more typical cereal proteins, such as gluten and zein, are prolamines (prolamins). The minor protein of oat is a prolamine, avenin.

Oat protein is nearly equivalent in quality to soy protein, which World Health Organization research has shown is equal to meat, milk, and egg protein. The protein content of the hull-less oat kernel (groat) ranges from 12 to 24%, the highest among cereals.

Coeliac disease (celiac disease) is often associated with the ingestion of a group of proteins labelled prolamines, or more commonly, gluten. Oats lack many of the prolamines found in wheat; however, oats do contain avenin. Avenin is a prolamine that is toxic to the intestinal mucosa of avenin-sensitive individuals, and can trigger a reaction.

The most recent research indicates that some cultivars of oat can be a safe part of a gluten-free diet, because different varieties of oat have different levels of toxicity. Although oats do contain avenin, there are several studies suggesting that this may not be problematic for all coeliacs.
Supplements with this ingredient:
DecaFire (Prohormones)
Post Cycle 3X (Post Cycle Support)
Stage II Evolution PCT Rejuvenation (Post Cycle Support)

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